Who We Are - Our Story GFWC

The Woman’s Club of Aransas Pass was organized in 1909 and federated in 1911 by 31 original charter members.  Mrs. H. Brook was the first president.  While the dynamics of the club have changed over time, the original club charter promoted literary, social, and philanthropic work along practical lines and aided in the extension of city improvement.  The Woman's Club of Aransas Pass is charitable 50l(c)(3) organization. Proceeds from membership, events, and donations support our Education, Community Improvement, Leadership and Self-improvement of its members, and maintaining our garden located at corner of Harrison blvd & Willson (Harrison Blvd Triangle).  It is a 501 c-3 charitable organization.  Donations are tax deductible.

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  Jane Cunningham Croly

Founded in 1890, GFWC’s roots can be traced back to 1868 when Jane Cunningham Croly, a professional journalist, attempted to attend a dinner at an all-male press club honoring British novelist Charles Dickens. Croly was denied admittance based upon her gender, and in response, formed a woman’s club—Sorosis. In celebration of Sorosis’ 21st anniversary in 1889, Jane Croly invited women’s clubs throughout the United States to pursue the cause of federation by attending a convention in New York City. On the last day of the conference, the women voted to form a larger organization to support clubs throughout the nation and further their efforts. A committee was chosen to draft a constitution. The new constitution was adopted in 1890, and the General Federation of Women's Clubs (GFWC) was born. In 1901 the GFWC was granted a charter by the United States Congress. Croly also founded the Women's Press Club of New York and became its first president

GFWC Texas

TFWC was organized in 1897 and was federated in 1890. GFWC Texas is a member of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs, the world’s largest organization of women in volunteer service. Its purpose is to combine the efforts of women’s clubs for improvements in education, natural resource conservation, home life, public affairs, international affairs, the arts, and Texas heritage.  In order to promote and facilitate the exchange of information, the state is divided into districts. Annual reporting by each club through the districts, assist the state officers in keeping up with the activities, programs and work done by the individual clubs.

 

 

TFWC South Texas District

The South Texas District is made up of Woman’s Clubs from Laredo to Duval and San Patricio Counties, South including the entire Rio Grande Valley. 

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We believe all women can embrace who they are,
can define their future, and can change the world.

 

Our Mission

Our Vision

We Need Your Support Today!